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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)
that continue to do better. in states like california that are now threatened with exact same spending problems that we've seen in washington. stuart: travis brown, ma pleasure indeed, you're the first guest on the show and you called it for romney. you're on videotape. thank you very much. new at 10 we will get the latest poll from maris and rasmussen reports. it's a dead heat with the other polls with less than a day to go. at the top of the hour, a fresh look at the race with the very latest polls, fresh out of the box this morning. don't forget tomorrow there will be two servings of "varney & company," we will be on at our regular time. 9:20 a.m. eastern and then back tomorrow night for a "varney & company" special election edition, 5 p.m. eastern, please don't miss it, all-star lineup for you. back to the column, apple says it virtually sold out of the ipad mini, 3 million sold, really? >> here is the thing. 3 million ipads sold over three days, however, they're not breaking whether it was ipad mini or the original ipad or the ipad 3 or the 2 or whatever, okay? all we know 3 million ipads
a lot of time in california, illinois, new york, texas. those are four states that the candidates did not spend much time if at all this year with the exception of going to fund raise. that shows how different things are now. >> woodruff: richard, it's certainly not that there hasn't been partisanship. it's a matter of... whether there's been geographic partisanship. >> that's well put, judy. ohio, for example, for most of its history for well over 100 years has stood out. it's been the mother of presidents and the maker of presidents. it's the country in microcosm. it is urban. it is rural. it is agricultural. it is industrial. it is a strong tradition of organized labor. it has significant minority populations. if you were going to disstill the united states in the mid 20th century at the end of the 20th century, you know, you'd be hard pressed to do better than ohio. in some ways it makes a lot of sense that ohio has attracted as much attention as it has. >> ifill: michael and richard, let's think about california. big, big state. very diverse. densely populated. has farms. it has
@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
a record turn out in california. the secretary of state says many precincts reporting a high volume of voters. 18 million people registered to vote for the election. that is a state record. half of those plan to vote by mail.uu=รท >> really interesting to see such a large turn out in polling places because i'm also suspecting that we're going to have largest vote by mail turn out in the history of the state. >> that is a big achievement considering only 31% of the eligible voters took part in the june primary. many voters dropped off ballot was out leaving their cars. san jose's most watched race is measure did. california schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to
, the ballot initiative process in california is so famous. i do want to say that california had a couple of controversial ones here, 1, they did not vote down the death penalty, still allowed in california. 2, it looks like they passed a tax measure to make california the most taxed state in the union. so that's controversial here in california. a bit of a surprise, considering the economy here in the golden state isn't the best. but you mention the process, the ballot process across the country. yes, definitely, same-sex marriage and marijuana both faired very well at the ballot box. maine passed it, as well as maryland and washington, all passing referendums, allowing for same-sex marriage. they legalized it again in maine, maryland and washington, and an amendment to vote against it in minnesota is too close to call at this hour. meantime, to the medical marijuana front, we know that two big states here that passed the medical marijuana were -- lost you here, montana. and in oregon, it's failing. the interesting vote with marijuana was the fact that colorado and washington allowed it
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
. california voters face a tough choice at the poll today. raise taxes or get hit with massive budget cuts. it's an issue that would have nationwide ramifications. but first, here's a look at what's happening in the world and what we have been covering here on "cbs this morning." >> after all the rallies, after the millions of dollars of ads, it all comes down to you. >> this is the day when voters choose the next president of the united states. >> early voting has really been key to the obama campaign strategy. they are leading in the early vote in almost every battleground state. >> one day away from a fresh start. one day away from the first day of a new beginning. >> i talked to a top campaign ad last night. he said romney was confident and that they're feeling good. >> the election may be already over, actually, and we don't know it. >> it's going to be a narrow race. we're even or ahead in nearly every one of these battleground states. >> you know the governor like i do, he's not someone to sit around until the job is done. >> the nor'easter is sure to make life harder for sandy's victim
was a young man. i worked in california for a movie actor who wanted to become governor. and i've seen nothing but the republican party in a degeneration mode. sarah palin. can you believe that? host: did you vote for ronald reagan in those years? caller: i voted for eisenhower. i voted for goldwater. the conscience of the conservative. now i see the degeneration of the republican party and it makes me sad because i believed in many of the principles. but the people that somehow they put forth by whatever forces there are controlling it, and i have no clue as to who is controlling it, it just dismays me and breaks my heart. host: let's hear from louis in oxon hill, md., on our independent line. caller: i'm going to vote for president obama. i believe in his vision. as a student, -- his prospects are so great for the country. every student should vote for him. in 2008, i voted for president obama and i am so pumped up again. i am so motivated. i am going to vote for president obama. i think mitt romney has nothing to offer the country. and i really feel president obama will win. he has my vote.
news today, california representative mary bono mack is conceding her seat. representative mack today conceded her race to democrat raul ruiz, who joins a large freshman contingent in the state's delegation. ruiz was leading mack by 4,679 votes as of thursday evening, with thousands of absentee and provisional ballots still to count. dr. ruiz will do a fine job if he is guided as well by the people of the congressional district as i was. please give him the opportunity to succeed, bono mack said in a statement. we want to thank all the folks who participated in this particular segment of the "washington journal." we want to let our viewers and listeners know that coming up, a discussion on the impact of the tea party in the 2012 election. and later in the program, author ira shapiro will join us to look at the prospects for compromise in the senate. this is the "washington journal." today is saturday, november 10. we'll be right back. >> here's a look at some books being publish this had week. jon meacham recounts president thomas jefferson's political prowess in "thomas jefferson: th
: it is the sum of its house district + two for the senate. each state has two senators. california has 55 electoral votes. the district of columbia is awarded three electoral votes. host: jim from iowa, hello. caller: i have a question. in past years with george bush and al gore, that went back and forth. are they planning to make changes to extensive monitoring ? it is a back and forth thing. i have watched this election thing go for 17 months. i used to be a democrat and i'm so disgusted. i went republican. i have a lot of concerns and reservations because i have seen a lot of things change in how things operate and how politicians operates and i am concerned. i got early to vote. host: thank you. guest: the electoral college has not rallied the masses. it is an issue that deals with political process. we have the 2000 election that george w. bush lost the popular vote. that election -- the issue discussion dominated by what happened in florida. there was not a lot of talk about scrapping the electoral college. there has not been a big movement to overhaul the electoral college. it is k
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
of my friends in coronado, california. wondering if you are related to anyone from connecticut. host: not sure. what are your thoughts about the general's resignation? caller: let me tell you something, we came here when i was a, we came to a military base. my stepfather served in the first marines. also we went to camp pendleton and he was the commander of that unit for many years. at the veterans day to our veterans. living and deceased. and active, i should say. about the general, were we all wearing rose colored glasses? i am sure some of his closest friends for making comments or had some kind of reservation about what was happening. the two of them together look very happy in conversation. i imagine that they had many, many other clandestine, you know, appearances together. the thing is, the thing that is hurtful is for the family. and, of course, the military and the government, there are a lot of answers. he will be held to a higher accounting. he has to bring it out. the pentagon will do that as well. the cia, the fbi, the president, all making sure that this is not swept un
people into jobs that are opening. there's a reason san diego, california is the human genome capital of the world. same deal, public, private, foundations, people working together. ever since the tea party took over the republican party -- >> boo! >> ever since the tea party took over the republican party, they say it's my way or the highway, we're right all the time. they've beat the distinguished republican senator from indiana, richard luger, their most important foreign policy spokesperson because he was attacked by his opponent for cooperating with president obama on national security. they're nominee actually said, i couldn't make this up, that his happiest day was when he was imposing his opinion on someone else and he wanted the people to send him to washington, so that he could have more partisanship in washington, d.c. now if you want it, you can have it. the people of indiana don't want it, congressman joe donnelly his opponent was ahead by 11 points in the most recent polls, you're going to change that. but it will all be for naught if you reward him by not electing presi
, and we have some projections to make here, george. california, we are ready to project for barack obama now. of course, the biggest democratic prize but got over 60% of the vote in '08 and ready to project washington state, a blue state for barack obama. idaho, that will be for governor romney. solid red state. that was also a big state for john mccain four years ago, and hawaii, his home state, that would have been a big disappointment. >> no chance that was going to happen. >> for barack obama but it certainly did. one more state before the polls close. >> let's go back to jake tapper and david muir with the campaigns. jake, let me start with you, clearly the excitement is starting to build inside the obama headquarters. they sense something is happening. >> reporter: indeed, george. president obama said earlier today that he could see this election spilling into tomorrow, but it does not seem right now that they think that's going to happen. you have all sorts of indications that president obama is getting prepared to come here to the mccormick center and we have all sorts of indicat
nearly 3.5 million people have cast their election lot. texas is second, california ranking third, trailing texas by just about 15,000 close votes. >> the fate of human dignity in our hands. blood's been spilt to afford us this moment. now, now, now! >> daniel day lewis from the upcoming movie "lincoln" portraying arguably the most popular and influential president ever. the latest cinematic blockbuster of steven spielberg. we take note steven spielberg and wife kate cap shaw have donated almost $1.3 million. bill maher and morgan freeman both giving about $1 million to that same obama superpac. as far as congressional contributions, california democrat howard berman has received almost $425,000 either directly or through a super pac. when we last saw berman he was taking part in the debate. that is a congressman on the left. things got a little bit nasty there by the way. polls are showing berman losing his battle to remain in congress. those are your number once. live from democracy plaza here on weekends with alex witt. and if you stumble, you get back up. up isn't easy, and we
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
the non- battleground states. we will go to california, on our line for republicans, helen, you are on. caller: good morning. i am a first-time caller. please do not cut me off. host: go ahead. caller: i will be so glad when this election is over. i was raised a republican. my whole entire life, never voted anything but republican. but i tell you what, anyone -- i switched this year, i was born to go independent, but i am going to go for barack obama. anyone that will vote for mitt romney has to be a 100% raist, or have a severe -- a 100% racist or have a severe mental problem. host: are you glad you are not subject to all of the presidential ads and mailings coming and to folks in ohio? caller: i am so glad. and i watched c-span, and the comments that i hear from the people, it is so sad. why do they hate this black president? and one thing i want to make clear. i am not voting for obama because we are black. host: we lost you there. i want to point to the columbus dispatch. the headline is -- mailings a nuisance for ohioans. those of any swing states are saying it every day, calling
looks really pretty from sandy. that's from the smokey mountains. then sunset in california. a beautiful one. from carlsbad. >>> the king of beers. budweiser temporarily turning off its brewing. >> that putting something else in the can, abc's john muller is on the story. >> good morning. sandy is a story about people. millions of them. amid those struggles and personal dramas corporations are pitching in. they're not turning water into wine, but it's almost miraculous. they're turning beer into water. 44,000 cases of zero brew h20 instead of brew. heading to the new york/new jersey. >> personally for me, it does mean a little bit more because i do have family that has been affected by it. >> reporter: they have been converting beer lines to water lines for disaster relief dating back to the san francisco earthquake of 1906. >> lot of people don't have opportunities to help. we look at this an opportunity to help. >> reporter: anheuser busch by no means alone. victoria secret generated attention loaning their generators to the national guard during the storm. for all of the corporations
jersey as cokie pointed out but also places like california which are states that he would have won anyway but there was so much organic enthusiasm for barack obama in 2008 that he won -- that a lot of people turned out even in deep blue states where their votes, of course, didn't count, they turned out in mass numbers. the president's people knee this yearhat's not going to happen. so in terms of the overall national popular vote, if you think about red states and blue states where neither campaign is trying to turn out the vote, the blue states like california and new york for various reasons the president's numbers won't be anywhere near as strong as they were in 2008 whereas in the deep red state there is's so much antipathy towards the president that people will turn out in those states even though they are deep red states. they'll turn out the cast a symbolic vote against barack obama. so that's one thing that skews the popular vote by conceivably on election day towards romney more than people are necessarily expecting >> i think that's absolutely right. the red states are re
in their bedrooms. one proposition that i find really interesting is the one in california showing the kind of antitax hysteria. that was an important one for the future. >> good luck, california, on the economy with that one. >> what should the justice do now in colorado and washington? >> if i look at the precedence, i think they'll be overturned. it just conflicts with federal law. >> so with arizona and the immigration. >> i don't think this will hold up, at least, under current supreme court precedent. >>> one more round to go. which candidates are already making their moves for 2016? the roundtable weighs in on that. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 let's talk about low-cost investing. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 at schwab, we're committed to offering you tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 low-cost investment options-- tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 like our exchange traded funds, or etfs tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 which now have the lowest tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 operating expenses tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 in their respective tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lipper categories. tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 lower than spdr tdd#: 1-800-345-2550 tdd#: 1-800-345-
proud that in california, our delegation of democrats is a majority of women, not even counting our two senators, senator feinstein and senator boxer. so women are empowered in california. i also want to acknowledge that although our number are great, two of our colleagues have gone on to the senate. senator baldwin -- [applause] >> we are very proud of that. senator-elect -- [applause] only the second woman of color to serve in the senate. so that's pretty exciting. and, unfortunately, we won't have capital coal -- kathy local and betty sutton in this next congress, but the future is soon and coming upon us and we know they will be making a great public contribution. so here we are. in the past week since the election were still finishing up some of our campaigns. we are very proud of the success or as i said yesterday, and as you see here today. why is it important for us to make this statement of the strength of women in the congress of the united states, of the house democratic women? because this is where hopes and dreams of america's families are rising. they may not know that. th
.c. for a while, moved to california. i was married for a while in california and then i moved to washington and i wasn't married again. and now, i'm about to get married again. [laughter] thank you. >> hopefully to the same guy. [laughter] don't forget that. >> you don't gets gifts every time either. that's the problem. so i did have this very, i certainly had a personal thing in that so i was very pleasantly surprised on that side and i do think that also, i want to look at this, but it feels to me like this time the disconnect between the prior polling in the actual voting wasn't as big as it has in the pass which past which suggests to the extent that people were saying kind of different things to survey takers than they were, if that ever was true, it feels like in this race are polling rejected that which was the margin and we won by the margin close to the polling. i think if that is true that is very good news for us as we go forward with this kind of thing. i think there was a tendency for us to have to feel that we had to really get very high numbers. and so that was good news. >> i was
like to be the new chief of staff to the governor of california. that was one where no one told him. we knew -- we were looking at returns coming in over the computer, and we saw it dwindling away. he wasn't up. i was the one who had to tell him because the top guys -- >> we put an absentee ballot program in effect in california in 1982 and we won the absentee ballots. he won election day but we had enough absentee ballots. >> that was the first time the absentee ballot gambit had been played and one. they came in and said why don't you go over the numbers with the mayor. megyn: do you bottom line it to the man saying you have lost? or do you just say -- >> i say there is going to be 100,000 votes coming in from orange county in a few minutes and when it does we'll go behind and i don't see a place where we can make it up. and you just don't have -- megyn: they work so hard no matter how want to win. they both work so hard. they have so many people who worked for them. god bless american democracy. this is the way it works. about it must be hard to recover. >> both of these candidates a
was at active in the civil rights movement in the 60s and in the 70s he was in northwest california where he and his wife raised their two sons neck and neil. he taught at a conference of one high school among the redwoods. and he began writing about contemporary issues. he is a prolific writer. his latest book is "mr. president: how and why the founders created a chief executive." it is my pleasure to welcome back to the david library, ray raphael. [applause] >> it is a pleasure to be at the david library with a full and eager crowd. this history is important. we will be talking not about ancient history by contemporary history. the history of the founding and let me start by noting that americans engage every four years into very unique principles. one in october and we are about to start six days from now. about half the nation firmly determined that their side loses nomination goes to ruins. they figure out which of the two contestants they prefer. that is one of our rituals. it is highly partisan. the other ritual that we will also talk about his every four years in october, americans u
the 2000 election when he said -- promised reporters, swore to us that he was going to win california, taking 320 votes in the electoral college. >> the same karl rove? >> the karl rove math. >> michelle, while romney has gone ugly and negative and he has a new ad out and uses the endorsement of colin powell. take a listen. >> will you endorse president obama? >> yes. when he took over we were in one of the worst recessions we had seen in recent times, close to a depression. and i saw, over the next several years, stabilization come back in the final community. housing is starting to pick up. the president saved the auto industry. >> so he's touting his record. he has a are republican colin powell touting his record. he's going positive in the -- in light of all of this ugliness. >> he is, although if you listen to the radio ads that are around in virginia, which is a big swing state, he also has some groups out there who are doing something akin to what the republicans are doing. not to quite the same degree but scaring people about health care and guy rights and stuff like that. but
.m. and then 1:00 a.m., we'll have california, hawaii, idaho, oregon, washington, and then the last poll closing in alaska. unless this is a very strange night, those races will be interesting for governors races and senate and house races and state issues, but not necessarily for the presidency. unless things go very, very differently than expected to go. this is how your election viewing is going to unfold hour by hour on tuesday night. if you just exclude the states for the presidential race where everybody pretty much knows exactly how it's going to go and just the states where there is some question as to what's going to happen, here is a clip and save thing for you about these states. the battlegrounds. all right? states that you know are going to be important and everybody thinks they're going to be close. these are the states everybody is going to be watching on tuesday night. each of these states, as you know, has a top elections official. and each of these states has a top elections official who is a partisan. who is either a democrat or a republican. and in a democracy, that should me
. and i'll bring the national map up, look at the latest. he eeked this out because of california. 50-48. trust me, at the white house, this is a narrow victory, but winning the popular vote and the electoral college will help them. we have a very difficult governing challenge ahead. had governor romney won the popular vote, and president obama won the electoral college, then you have a lot more, shall we say, grumpy people this morning. >> grumpy people this morning. people were perhaps grumpy watching a little bit last night, depending on your political perspective. i was watching you. i feel like the turning point was when you start doing the math, almost impossible for romney to hit that 270 mark once, you know, nevada went obama and then missouri and then it was the final projection because of ohio, right? >> because of ohio. missouri went for governor romney. as you watched early on, you knew coming in that governor romney had a harder path to 270. you knew he needed this. we haven't called that yet. the president is leading now. it is blue on this map because that is the vote t
for a minute in the battleground states. what about california? if part of you can't get 45% of the vote, much above 40% of the vote in california is not a party about the future. >> and blaming chris christie is exactly maybe what's wrong with the party. you tell me. he should step above it. but can he? >> i think there are a lot of republicans that need to fight back. and you look at this party, jon meacham, this party has lost 5 out of the last 6 elections when it comes to the popular vote. and they had a great victory two years ago, but the same thing happened in 1994. look historically, jon. 1992, bill clinton, a new democrat wins. two years later rejected by a republican revolution. two years later, re-elected. the same thing has happened again. by republicans who have won. republicans won an historic landslide. we were here two years ago. a lot of unhappy democrats. two years later, they're seen as overreaching and rejected by the american people. >> democrats have shown a greater capacity of the modern era to learn from adversity. and the '94 example is the great one. president bush, i
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 95 (some duplicates have been removed)